Sunday, June 12, 2022 - Scripture Reflection

Scripture Reflection

Jun 10
Sunday, June 12, 2022

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Reading I
Prv 8:22-31

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 8:4-5, 6-7, 8-9

Reading II
Rom 5:1-5

Gospel
Jn 16:12-15


The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that the Trinity: “is the central mystery of Christian faith and life. It is the mystery of God in himself.  It is therefore the source of all the other mysteries of faith, the light that enlightens them” (CCC 234).  The Most Holy Trinity is foundational and fundamental to our church teaching.  Yet, for something so foundational, it is truly difficult to explain.  Each Sunday we profess a belief in the Most Holy Trinity in our creed.  We do so almost automatically, without pausing to take in each phrase and the weight they carry.  Theologians far greater than I have fallen close to error when trying to explain what we mean and understand as The Most Holy Trinity.  I confess to experiencing a bit of anxiety when I realized that I was to “reflect” on this particular Sunday.  However, with prayer and our readings to guide me, I will endeavor to reflect on this great mystery without falling into error.

There are two nuggets of truth about the Trinity that I hope you take with you into your week.  The Most Holy Trinity is about unity and relationship. CCC 253 tells us, “We do not confess three Gods, but one God in three persons.” God is One—Unity.  But CCC 255 also tells us, “the real distinction of the persons from one another resides solely in the relationships which relate them to one another”. Our one God in three persons is also about relationship within that unity.  We have been made in the image of the Triune God. We are called to conform ourselves to God who is both unity and relationship.

This message could not be more timely.  Our world and nation is fraught with violence—violence of nation against nation and person against person.  We are a divided people, and are at times, set against one another without willingness to compromise.  It is in this backdrop that we are reminded that our God is about unity and relationship.  In a time of discord and division, as baptized believers in Christ we are called to seek communion and reconciliation with our brothers and sisters. Our Gospel today is taken from the last supper discourses.  Jesus has just told his disciples what a tough road they had ahead of them.  But he assured them that even when he was not physically present to them, he would send the Spirit of Truth to guide them.  He assures them that “everything that the Father his is mine; for this reason I told you that he will take from what is mine and declare it to you.” God the Father with the Son and through the Holy Spirit is present to each of us. God will give us what we need to be the presence in the world we are called to be if we are open to it.  St. Paul to the Romans reminds us that as believers in Christ we can have hope because we have God with us.  The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity has an important message for us in a divisive time: we called to be in communion with one another, seeking the good for the other.

By: Katie L. Zuzik, Pastoral Associate, Blessed Sacrament Cathedral, Greensburg, PA